Engage. Your Community

Driver for 16 GB Kingston DataTraveler 10163 (or 101 63) usb key ?

This usb key's packaging says it's USB 3.1/3.0/2.0 and it doesn't work with Korora 25, not with the Mate DE anyway; but, I have Kingston 2.0 keys (older ones, 2 and 4 GB) and these work. Caja doesn't at all see the newer key and I assume that this means that Linux itself doesn't detect it at all. A friend said that the problem likely is that a necessary driver is lacking, so I used yumex-dnf to see if an appropriate driver package is available and none seem to be. That search was done by using "driver" and "usb", separately.

Do you know if there's a solution that'll make Linux recognize this key?

How do you know that it isn't recognised?

If you plug the key in and run dmesg in a terminal does it show anything? The last few lines should give some indication of what the system thinks the device is.

ozjd wrote:
How do you know that it isn't recognised?

If you plug the key in and run dmesg in a terminal does it show anything? The last few lines should give some indication of what the system thinks the device is.

Ran dmesg, but it produces a very long list, very many lines of output, and I don't know how to interpret this.

The following output is only a sampling after having put the 16 GB usb stick in and then running dmesg.

Quote:
[22:31 michel ~]$ dmesg [ 0.000000] Linux version 4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 (mockbuild@bkernel01.phx2.fedoraproject.org) (gcc version 6.3.1 20161221 (Red Hat 6.3.1-1) (GCC) ) #1 SMP Tue Jun 20 20:21:11 UTC 2017
[ 0.000000] Command line: BOOT_IMAGE=/vmlinuz-4.11.6-201.fc25.x86_64 root=/dev/mapper/korora-root ro rd.lvm.lv=korora/root rd.lvm.lv=korora/swap rhgb quiet nouveau.modeset=0 rd.driver.blacklist=nouveau video=vesa:off LANG=en_CA.UTF-8
[ 0.000000] x86/fpu: Supporting XSAVE feature 0x001: 'x87 floating point registers'
[ 0.000000] x86/fpu: Supporting XSAVE feature 0x002: 'SSE registers'
[ 0.000000] x86/fpu: Enabled xstate features 0x3, context size is 576 bytes, using 'standard' format.
[ 0.000000] e820: BIOS-provided physical RAM map:
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000009bbff] usable
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000000009bc00-0x000000000009ffff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000000100000-0x00000000df44d3ff] usable
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000df44f400-0x00000000dfffffff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000f8000000-0x00000000fbffffff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fec00000-0x00000000fec0ffff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fed18000-0x00000000fed1bfff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fed20000-0x00000000fed8ffff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000feda0000-0x00000000feda5fff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee0ffff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000ffe60000-0x00000000ffffffff] reserved
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000100002000-0x000000011fffffff] usable
[ 0.000000] NX (Execute Disable) protection: active
[ 0.000000] SMBIOS 2.4 present.
[ 0.000000] DMI: Dell Inc. Latitude E6500 /0X564R, BIOS A29 06/04/2013
[ 0.000000] e820: update [mem 0x00000000-0x00000fff] usable ==> reserved
[ 0.000000] e820: remove [mem 0x000a0000-0x000fffff] usable
[ 0.000000] e820: last_pfn = 0x120000 max_arch_pfn = 0x400000000
[ 0.000000] MTRR default type: uncachable
[ 0.000000] MTRR fixed ranges enabled:
[ 0.000000] 00000-9FFFF write-back
[ 0.000000] A0000-BFFFF uncachable
[ 0.000000] C0000-D3FFF write-protect
[ 0.000000] D4000-EFFFF uncachable
[ 0.000000] F0000-FFFFF write-protect
[ 0.000000] MTRR variable ranges enabled:
[ 0.000000] 0 base 000000000 mask 800000000 write-back
[ 0.000000] 1 base 0E0000000 mask FE0000000 uncachable
[ 0.000000] 2 disabled
[ 0.000000] 3 disabled
[ 0.000000] 4 disabled
[ 0.000000] 5 disabled
[ 0.000000] 6 disabled
[ 0.000000] x86/PAT: Configuration [0-7]: WB WC UC- UC WB WC UC- WT
[ 0.000000] e820: update [mem 0xe0000000-0xffffffff] usable ==> reserved
[ 0.000000] e820: last_pfn = 0xdf44d max_arch_pfn = 0x400000000
[ 0.000000] Base memory trampoline at [ffff9943c0095000] 95000 size 24576
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59381000, 0x59381fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59382000, 0x59382fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59383000, 0x59383fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59384000, 0x59384fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59385000, 0x59385fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59386000, 0x59386fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59387000, 0x59387fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] BRK [0x59388000, 0x59388fff] PGTABLE
[ 0.000000] RAMDISK: [mem 0x35a6f000-0x36d2ffff]
[ 0.000000] ACPI: Early table checksum verification disabled
[ 0.000000] ACPI: RSDP 0x00000000000FB9C0 000024 (v02 DELL ) [ 0.000000] ACPI: XSDT 0x00000000DF451E00 00006C (v01 DELL M09 27DD0604 ASL 00000061)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: FACP 0x00000000DF451C9C 0000F4 (v04 DELL M09 27DD0604 ASL 00000061)
[ 0.000000] ACPI BIOS Warning (bug): 32/64X length mismatch in FADT/Gpe0Block: 128/64 (20170119/tbfadt-603)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: DSDT 0x00000000DF452400 006D0B (v02 INT430 SYSFexxx 00001001 INTL 20050624)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: FACS 0x00000000DF460C00 000040
[ 0.000000] ACPI: FACS 0x00000000DF460C00 000040
[ 0.000000] ACPI: HPET 0x00000000DF451F00 000038 (v01 DELL M09 00000001 ASL 00000061)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: ____ 0x00000000DF460400 000030 (v01 DELL M09 27DD0604 ASL 00000061)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: APIC 0x00000000DF452000 000068 (v01 DELL M09 27DD0604 ASL 00000047)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: ASF! 0x00000000DF451C00 00006A (v32 DELL M09 27DD0604 ASL 00000061)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: MCFG 0x00000000DF451FC0 00003C (v16 DELL M09 27DD0604 ASL 00000061)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: TCPA 0x00000000DF452300 000032 (v01 00000000 ASL 00000000)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: SLIC 0x00000000DF45209C 000176 (v01 DELL M09 27DD0604 ASL 00000061)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000DF45032D 00066C (v01 PmRef CpuPm 00003000 INTL 20050624)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
[ 0.000000] No NUMA configuration found
[ 0.000000] Faking a node at [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000011fffffff]
[ 0.000000] NODE_DATA(0) allocated [mem 0x11ffd3000-0x11fffdfff]
[ 0.000000] Zone ranges:
[ 0.000000] DMA [mem 0x0000000000001000-0x0000000000ffffff]
[ 0.000000] DMA32 [mem 0x0000000001000000-0x00000000ffffffff]
[ 0.000000] Normal [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x000000011fffffff]
[ 0.000000] Device empty
[ 0.000000] Movable zone start for each node
[ 0.000000] Early memory node ranges
[ 0.000000] node 0: [mem 0x0000000000001000-0x000000000009afff]
[ 0.000000] node 0: [mem 0x0000000000100000-0x00000000df44cfff]
[ 0.000000] node 0: [mem 0x0000000100002000-0x000000011fffffff]
[ 0.000000] Initmem setup node 0 [mem 0x0000000000001000-0x000000011fffffff]
[ 0.000000] On node 0 totalpages: 1045477
[ 0.000000] DMA zone: 64 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] DMA zone: 21 pages reserved
[ 0.000000] DMA zone: 3994 pages, LIFO batch:0
[ 0.000000] DMA32 zone: 14226 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] DMA32 zone: 910413 pages, LIFO batch:31
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 2048 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 131070 pages, LIFO batch:31
[ 0.000000] ACPI: PM-Timer IO Port: 0x1008
[ 0.000000] ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
[ 0.000000] ACPI: LAPIC_NMI (acpi_id[0x00] high edge lint[0x1])
[ 0.000000] ACPI: LAPIC_NMI (acpi_id[0x01] high edge lint[0x1])
[ 0.000000] IOAPIC[0]: apic_id 2, version 32, address 0xfec00000, GSI 0-23
[ 0.000000] ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 0 global_irq 2 dfl dfl)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 9 global_irq 9 high level)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: IRQ0 used by override.
[ 0.000000] ACPI: IRQ9 used by override.
[ 0.000000] Using ACPI (MADT) for SMP configuration information
[ 0.000000] ACPI: HPET id: 0x8086a201 base: 0xfed00000
[ 0.000000] smpboot: Allowing 2 CPUs, 0 hotplug CPUs
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0x00000000-0x00000fff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0x0009b000-0x0009bfff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0x0009c000-0x0009ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0x000a0000-0x000fffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xdf44d000-0xdf44ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xdf450000-0xdfffffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xe0000000-0xf7ffffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xf8000000-0xfbffffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfc000000-0xfebfffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfec00000-0xfec0ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfec10000-0xfed17fff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfed18000-0xfed1bfff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfed1c000-0xfed1ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfed20000-0xfed8ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfed90000-0xfed9ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfeda0000-0xfeda5fff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfeda6000-0xfedfffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfee00000-0xfee0ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xfee10000-0xffe5ffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0xffe60000-0xffffffff]
[ 0.000000] PM: Registered nosave memory: [mem 0x100000000-0x100001fff]
[ 0.000000] e820: [mem 0xe0000000-0xf7ffffff] available for PCI devices
[ 0.000000] Booting paravirtualized kernel on bare hardware
[ 0.000000] clocksource: refined-jiffies: mask: 0xffffffff max_cycles: 0xffffffff, max_idle_ns: 1910969940391419 ns
[ 0.000000] setup_percpu: NR_CPUS:8192 nr_cpumask_bits:2 nr_cpu_ids:2 nr_node_ids:1

... (etc.)

End quote

I don't understand much of anything, if anything at all, of what's quoted above and there's still more (MUCH, over 3,000 lines in total), but I don't want to post all of it, for the above already is very long.

If you can tell me some keywords to use for search, then I'll be able to pipe the output of dmesg using grep and then get, potentially anyway, more helpful info.

As I said above it is the last few lines that are important. You should see something like

60206.218051] usb 2-1: new high-speed USB device number 10 using xhci_hcd
[160206.388482] usb 2-1: New USB device found, idVendor=05dc, idProduct=a81d
[160206.388488] usb 2-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[160206.388491] usb 2-1: Product: USB Flash Drive
[160206.388493] usb 2-1: Manufacturer: Lexar
[160206.388496] usb 2-1: SerialNumber: AA1Z6I3CNU4VFTIE
[160206.391418] usb-storage 2-1:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected
[160206.391735] scsi host3: usb-storage 2-1:1.0
[160207.685758] scsi 3:0:0:0: Direct-Access     Lexar    USB Flash Drive  1100 PQ: 0 ANSI: 4
[160207.686947] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] 15634432 512-byte logical blocks: (8.00 GB/7.46 GiB)
[160207.687135] sd 3:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg3 type 0
[160207.687442] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write Protect is off
[160207.687448] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Mode Sense: 43 00 00 00
[160207.687980] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] No Caching mode page found
[160207.687991] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Assuming drive cache: write through
[160207.691481]  sdd: sdd1
[160207.693642] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Attached SCSI removable disk

For pasting large amounts of text like above please use fpaste.

ozjd wrote:
As I said above it is the last few lines that are important. You should see something like

60206.218051] usb 2-1: new high-speed USB device number 10 using xhci_hcd  
[160206.388482] usb 2-1: New USB device found, idVendor=05dc, idProduct=a81d  

... (snipped)

  
For pasting large amounts of text like above please use [fpaste](https://kororaproject.org/support/documentation/fpaste).  

Here's some of the end of the dmesg output after having removed my 2 and 4 GB usb sticks and then putting in the newer 16 GB stick.

Quote:
[298974.647376] CPU1: Core temperature/speed normal
[299199.261182] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[299199.412209] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[299515.207137] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[299515.357200] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[299595.368680] usb 2-3: USB disconnect, device number 8
[299607.264797] usb 2-4: USB disconnect, device number 3
[299617.965978] usb 2-3: new high-speed USB device number 9 using ehci-pci
[299618.085705] usb 2-3: New USB device found, idVendor=13fe, idProduct=5100
[299618.085709] usb 2-3: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[299618.085712] usb 2-3: Product: USB DISK 53X
[299618.085714] usb 2-3: Manufacturer: Phison
[299618.085716] usb 2-3: SerialNumber: 000000000003
[299618.087359] usb-storage 2-3:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected
[299618.089100] scsi host6: usb-storage 2-3:1.0
[299619.119393] scsi 6:0:0:0: Direct-Access 13FE USB DISK 50X PMAP PQ: 0 ANSI: 4
[299619.127591] sd 6:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0
[299619.129334] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk
[299831.260193] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[299831.411191] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[300147.205174] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[300147.354188] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[300463.209178] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[300463.362231] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[300779.255151] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[300779.406201] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
...
End quote

This is the link for the fpaste page for the above, https://paste.fedoraproject.org/paste/5bWIETep0H-FC8GtVfyqWw .

Very strange output to me. What the heck is the wlan0 (not being ready) stuff mean? Also, the system seems to detect the newer 16 GB usb stick this thread is about, but Caja doesn't see the stick. Because what's quoted above seems to say or mean that the usb stick is detected, I ran dmesg again, after having removed and then re-connected the stick. The following is the last part of the (LONG) output.

Quote:
[301983.793586] CPU1: Core temperature/speed normal
[302043.205179] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[302043.355195] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[302210.508563] usb 2-3: USB disconnect, device number 9
[302359.209156] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[302359.360270] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[302675.217140] b43-phy0: Loading firmware version 784.2 (2012-08-15 21:35:19)
[302675.368220] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready
[302726.597958] usb 2-3: new high-speed USB device number 10 using ehci-pci
[302726.717641] usb 2-3: New USB device found, idVendor=13fe, idProduct=5100
[302726.717644] usb 2-3: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[302726.717647] usb 2-3: Product: USB DISK 53X
[302726.717649] usb 2-3: Manufacturer: Phison
[302726.717652] usb 2-3: SerialNumber: 000000000003
[302726.719218] usb-storage 2-3:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected
[302726.721446] scsi host6: usb-storage 2-3:1.0
[302727.726808] scsi 6:0:0:0: Direct-Access 13FE USB DISK 50X PMAP PQ: 0 ANSI: 4
[302727.730290] sd 6:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0
[302727.732047] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk

...
End quote

Also, here're what the df command, without options, displays; first, with only the newer 16 GB stick connected (no other sticks), and then with the latter removed but the older 2 and 4 GB sticks reconnected.

Quote:
[15:04 michel ~]$ df
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs 2005304 0 2005304 0% /dev
tmpfs 2016984 304 2016680 1% /dev/shm
tmpfs 2016984 1416 2015568 1% /run
tmpfs 2016984 0 2016984 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/mapper/korora-root 51475068 11723180 37114064 25% /
tmpfs 2016984 36 2016948 1% /tmp
/dev/sda1 487652 169694 288262 38% /boot
/dev/mapper/korora-home 184117324 19115976 155625604 11% /home
tmpfs 403396 158156 245240 40% /run/user/1000

[15:04 michel ~]$ df
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs 2005304 0 2005304 0% /dev
tmpfs 2016984 304 2016680 1% /dev/shm
tmpfs 2016984 1444 2015540 1% /run
tmpfs 2016984 0 2016984 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/mapper/korora-root 51475068 11723180 37114064 25% /
tmpfs 2016984 36 2016948 1% /tmp
/dev/sda1 487652 169694 288262 38% /boot
/dev/mapper/korora-home 184117324 19116076 155625504 11% /home
tmpfs 403396 158156 245240 40% /run/user/1000
/dev/sdb1 1952800 524960 1427840 27% /run/media/michel/KINGSTON
/dev/sdc1 3823396 2828088 995308 74% /run/media/michel/KINGSTON1

End quote

I'd prefer to use block formatting using simple tags but don't understand your formatting page clearly enough for posting text like cited above.

If you compare the sample output I posted and your's you will see that there are a couple of lines different / missing

[160207.687442] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write Protect is off
[160207.687448] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Mode Sense: 43 00 00 00
[160207.687980] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] No Caching mode page found
[160207.687991] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Assuming drive cache: write through
[160207.691481]  sdd: sdd1

That suggests to me that the system isn't seeing any partitions on that drive. Without partitions Caja can't open it. So either the USB isn't formatted or doesn't have a format that the system recognises, or maybe the contents of the disk are corrupted. I think that is all the possibilities. Can it be mounted elsewhere?

There is a simplified guide to Engage that covers the regularly used formatting options, see https://kororaproject.org/support/documentation/using-engage. Text boxes are covered at the end.

ozjd wrote:
If you compare the sample output I posted and your's you will see that there are a couple of lines different / missing

Thanks, I'll look into what your're saying. Don't know how long it'll take but will look into it. With that said, it's always struck me as strange to get the message of, quote: "No Caching mode page found" and then or followed by, quote: "Assuming drive cache: write through".

Michel wrote:
With that said, it's always struck me as strange to get the message of, quote: "No Caching mode page found" and then or followed by, quote: "Assuming drive cache: write through".

Not sure what that means either, maybe should look into it. Another one for the 'to learn' list :).

ozjd wrote:

Michel wrote:
With that said, it's always struck me as strange to get the message of, quote: "No Caching mode page found" and then or followed by, quote: "Assuming drive cache: write through".

Not sure what that means either, maybe should look into it. Another one for the 'to learn' list :).

Thanks. If you don't know what those two lines say or mean, then I feel better and will just need to try some additional Web searches. It's a curious message. I've never, before, seen such a message and have been using PC's for over 20 years (MS Windows, Interactive UNIX System V, and Linux). So, it'll just take some Web searches.

It means there is no cache on the device. Hard disks often have a cache which data is stored on whilst waiting to be written to the device - i.e. transfer of data is faster than the writing mode. USB storage devices usually do not have a cache so data is written directly.

This explains it well.

jfarrar wrote:
It means there is no cache on the device. Hard disks often have a cache which data is stored on whilst waiting to be written to the device - i.e. transfer of data is faster than the writing mode. USB storage devices usually do not have a cache so data is written directly.

This explains it well.

Thanks. Seems the message is from the kernel and doesn't indicate any serious problem. So, I'll just ignore it, unless trying as some people suggest in the thread you linked to.

Also, in my last prior post I said to not have seen the message before, as if it was totally new to me. Should've said before using Korora or certainly Korora with the laptop I'm currently using (since last September) anyway. I'm pretty sure to have had the message prior to beginning to use a laptop, but the computer used before the Dell Latitude E6500 laptop was a Dell OptiPlex mini-tower and am pretty sure it had L3 cache and, if correct, then it was on the motherboard. So ... ?. I don't know if the laptop also has such cache but if it does, then maybe it's not being used or possibly isn't related. (???...) I don't have enough hardware and Linux kernel knowledge.

ozjd wrote:
If you compare the sample output I posted and your's you will see that there are a couple of lines different / missing

[160207.687442] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write Protect is off  
[160207.687448] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Mode Sense: 43 00 00 00  
[160207.687980] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] No Caching mode page found  
[160207.687991] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Assuming drive cache: write through  
[160207.691481]  sdd: sdd1  

That suggests to me that the system isn't seeing any partitions on that drive. Without partitions Caja can't open it. So either the USB isn't formatted or doesn't have a format that the system recognises, or maybe the contents of the disk are corrupted. I think that is all the possibilities.
Can it be mounted elsewhere?

...

I only have this Dell Latitude e6500 laptop so no means of mounting the 16 GB Kingston usb stick to anything else; but, my friend who gave me the stick has a laptop running Win 8.1, so if he can see the stick with that machine, then he'd surely be able to format or reformat the stick. What do you recommend for format though, FAT32, another FAT, NTFS, or other? That's while keeping in mind that I'd want to be able to use the stick with Linux as well as with Windows, for (public and school) library computers, f.e., apparently are all with Windows and I occasionally make use of such computers?

Fat32 or NTFS should work on the widest range of operating systems. Fat32 seems to be the most common choice.

ozjd wrote:
Fat32 or NTFS should work on the widest range of operating systems. Fat32 seems to be the most common choice.

Thanks. I'll ask him to format or reformat the stick using FAT32, which I think to have often seen for formatting. Not sure why, for I probabaly would normally lean to NTFS, but FAT or FAT32 was often suggested. I don't know why.

FAT32 is the most common default for most USB sticks that you purchase. Never seen otherwise.

M_aD wrote:
FAT32 is the most common default for most USB sticks that you purchase. Never seen otherwise.

Thanks. FAT32 is a format I've often seen mention of with Linux. I don't know about the other formats for drives but FAT32 was often recommended.

But a problem with the 16 GB usb stick is that it apparently needs to be reformatted and I have absolutely no access to the stick, so can't reformat it Hence, it remains unusable. Imo, this is weird with Linux, but I'm an old'timer with Linux, not very experienced with newer Linux.

Since reading through this topic is quite time consuming, not knowing if it has been advised or not... but did you try different usb ports to see if it works ? Is the usb stick a new one or has it been used before elsewhere and has been encrypted? Again, FAT32 is a common format which is the default for the majority of USB sticks, a factory/industrial (or whatever it's called) standard afaik, it has nothing to do with being linux specific. Go on and try to see if it can be formatted in FAT32 on a computer running windows, may it be from a friends computer or whatever. Maybe go to a shop nearby that sell computers and stuff to help you out.

M_aD wrote:
Since reading through this topic is quite time consuming, not knowing if it has been advised or not... but did you try different usb ports to see if it works ? Is the usb stick a new one or has it been used before elsewhere and has been encrypted?
Again, FAT32 is a common format which is the default for the majority of USB sticks, a factory/industrial (or whatever it's called) standard afaik, it has nothing to do with being linux specific.
Go on and try to see if it can be formatted in FAT32 on a computer running windows, may it be from a friends computer or whatever. Maybe go to a shop nearby that sell computers and stuff to help you out.

Yes, it's become evident that I should do as you suggest. Didn't think it'd be this extreme, say, but it seems that none of you folks, here, have had the same problem. So. I'll take your input for further searches. Maybe having my friend reformat the stick using FAT32 will work and it's what I'll next try. He has Win. 8.1, so that should suffice.

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